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Aug 14, 2017
Eclipse may pose danger to those who view it
About 500 miles northeast of Madera, and elsewhere in the U.S., people will be able to see the sun’s corona, the outermost part of its atmosphere that is normally drowned out by the brightness of the sun itself. Here a crescent sun will be visible, but


Mar 05, 2015
Protect Yourself Against Eye Injuries
According to eye experts and doctors, 90% of workplace eye injuries could be avoided or lessened if safety eyewear was worn properly.


Mar 05, 2015
Restoring Eye Sight with Scleral Contact Lenses
There are contact lenses available for virtually every vision problem including astigmatism, presbyopia, postsurgical and keratoconus. At Natural Vision we are committed to providing the best contact lens technology to help you see your world.


Frequently asked Questions


What Happens in LASIK?

First, your eyes are anesthetized with drops. Then, using a highly sophisticated tool called an auto-shaper, the doctor creates an extremely thin natural cover on the front of your eye that will provide a protective layer for area reshaped by the laser.

The cover is lifted to allow the laser to gently reshape the front of your eye for about 30 to 60 seconds. Then the natural cover is placed back down, and within a few minutes, the eye's cells begin to re-adhere to the cover and healing begins.

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How Long till I Can See (Healing time)?

Because the natural cover provides a protective layer for the area shaped by the laser, healing is very quick. (No stitches are needed!) Within a day or two, most patients see naturally more clearly than they ever have, without glasses or contacts.

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What is PRK?

PRK or Photorefractive Keratectomy is a procedure in which the front of your eye is reshaped so that you can see more clearly without glasses or contacts.

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What Happens in PRK?

In PRK, first your eyes are anesthetized with drops. Then the doctor uses an Excimer Ultraviolet Laser to gently reshape the front of your eye for about 30 to 60 seconds.

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Is there Any Pain?

After the procedure, the doctor will place a contact lens over your eye to protect it from the elements, unlike the LASIK procedure, with PRK the very surface of your eye is trying to heal, so there may often be pain for the first 24 to 48 hours. You will be given a regimen of drops to follow for a few weeks to help manage this. Finally, you will return for several post-operative visits.

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How Long Till I See Clearly?

Because the very surface of your eye has been operated on, it may take any where from a week to several months before you achieve your final vision correction as your eye heals.

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WHAT IS BOTOX®?

It is a purified protein that relaxes the muscles that cause the facial wrinkles.

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HOW LONG DOES BOTOX® LAST?

The effects last up to 4 months. Treatments can be repeated every 3-4 months.

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WHO CAN HAVE BOTOX®?

Age: 18 - 65, both female and male. Older patients can have treatments, but the results may be less effective.

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WHAT IS RADIESSE?

Radiesse is a synthetic, injectable implant. It is composed of nearly microscopic spheres made of calcium hydroxylapatite, or CaHA, in a water-based gel. It is injectable through very small needles due to the nature of the gel and the size of the spheres. Over time, the CaHA breaks down and is eliminated by the body. Like other dermal fillers, Radiesse is not a permanent treatment. Follow-up or maintenance procedures are required to maintain the anti wrinkle results.

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HOW LONG DOES RADIESSE LAST?

Lasting an average of 12 to 15 months, Radiesse has superior longevity in comparison to other dermal filler substances used today. Recovery time after Radiesse injection is only minutes to hours. The most common complications are temporary redness and bruising. It is our opinion that Radiesse not be used in the lips, due to the potential for lumps when used in that area.

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What is glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a disease process of the nerve of your eye. It is associated with certain risk factors, such as an elevated intra-ocular eye pressure, a family history of glaucoma, myopia, hypertension, ethnic differences and eye injuries. New technologies, such as Opto-Coherent Temography (OCT) allows rapid and objective measurements of all the nerve fibers in your eye and is dramatically changing the way we understand and treat this disease.

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What causes glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a disease process of the nerve of your eye. It is associated with certain risk factors, such as an elevated intra-ocular eye pressure, a family history of glaucoma, myopia, hypertension, ethnic differences and eye injuries. New technologies, such as Opto-Coherent Temography (OCT) allows rapid and objective measurements of all the nerve fibers in your eye and is dramatically changing the way we understand and treat this disease.

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Who is most likely to get glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a disease process of the nerve of your eye. It is associated with certain risk factors, such as an elevated intra-ocular eye pressure, a family history of glaucoma, myopia, hypertension, ethnic differences and eye injuries. New technologies, such as Opto-Coherent Temography (OCT) allows rapid and objective measurements of all the nerve fibers in your eye and is dramatically changing the way we understand and treat this disease.

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What are the symptoms of glaucoma?

At first, there are no symptoms. Vision stays normal and there is no pain. However, as the disease progresses, a person with glaucoma may notice his or her side vision gradually failing. That is, objects in the front may still be seen clearly, but objects to the side may be missed. As the disease worsens, the field of vision narrows and blindness results.

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How is glaucoma detected?

Many people may know of the "air puff" test or other tests to measure eye pressure in any eye examination. But this test alone cannot detect glaucoma. Glaucoma is found most often during an eye examination through dilated pupils. This means drops are put into the eyes during the exam to enlarge the pupils. This allows the eye care professional to see more of the inside of the eye to check for signs of glaucoma.

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How can glaucoma be treated?

Although open-angle glaucoma cannot be cured, it can usually be controlled. The most common treatments are:

- Medications
- These may be either in the form of eyedrops or pills. Some drugs are designed to reduce pressure by slowing the flow of fluid into the eye. Others help to improve fluid drainage.
- For most people with glaucoma, regular use of medications will control the increased fluid pressure. But these drugs may stop working over time. Or they may cause side effects. If a problem occurs, the eye care professional may select other drugs, change the dose, or suggest other ways to deal with the problem.
- Laser Surgery During laser surgery, a strong beam of light is focused on the part of the anterior chamber where the fluid leaves the eye. This results in a series of small changes, which makes it easier for fluid to exit the eye. Over time the effect of laser surgery may wear off. Patients who have this form of surgery may need to keep taking glaucoma drugs.

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